Tag Archives: supply chains

Digital Transformation Drives Supply Chain Restructuring Imperative – Supply Chain 24/7 Paper

The white paper lays out stages of maturity for digital transformation (DX is the acronym now being used!). I’ve not seen that before, and I wanted to see when someone would come up with such a notion.

This white paper explores the connection between enterprise digital transformation and the necessary restructuring that results in the supply chain.

  Source: Digital Transformation Drives Supply Chain Restructuring Imperative – Supply Chain 24/7 Paper

Here’s the white paper. You can also get it from the link above.

IDC_Digital_Transformation_in_the_Supply_Chain_Study_2017

State of the Logistics Union 2017

Dan Gilmore’s take on the latest report from CSCMP on the state of logistics.  A copy would be good reading, but you have to be a CSCMP member to get it free.

One interesting chart is this one showing innovations.  It’s a classic innovation grid showing estimated impact vertically, and when it’s likely to be mainstream horizontally. The authors think co-opetition in supply chains, a high-impact innovation, is going to be mainstream in a couple of years. While I agree it has high impact potential, I think it’s a lot farther off than that.  Especially in the US, we seem to be reverting to an unregulated world where markets rule, and this makes it very hard to hold cooperative schemes together.  Similarly, Brexit blows apart many attempts at cooperation cross-border, and as nations start trying to foist their local problems off on others we’ll see natural reactions.

Supply Chain Digest LogoLogistics Costs as Percent of GDP Down Again in 2016, Falling in Relative and Absolute Terms

Source: State of the Logistics Union 2017

 

Why Amazon is buying Whole Foods

A great article by DEREK THOMPSON

It is right on target about the reasons– they are supply chain reasons.  Amazon covets the urban locations to speed up deliveries; but it would be fantastically complex to procure and engineer these one at a time.  With the Whole Foods locations, they now have drop-off points for overnight delivery, and mini-warehouses for food items, especially those that need ‘fresh’ or ‘frozen’ treatment. $14 billion is cheap in terms of accessibility to a population, say within a circle of a given radius.

Perhaps we should rate warehouses and depots by a distribution of the number of customers in a unit of area.

  The retailer’s $14 billion bet isn’t just about the future of food. It’s about becoming the one-stop shop for your entire life.

Source: Why Amazon Bought Whole Foods – The Atlantic