Tag Archives: container shipping

DCLI acquires TRAC domestic chassis fleet

The chassis story never ceases to amaze. TRAC was positioning itself to be a big player only a couple of years ago. Now what? Is it unprofitable?  We are still wrestling with who will pay for chassis, and how to share the cost.

American Shipper

via NEWS FLASH: DCLI acquires TRAC domestic chassis fleet

 

The Megamax-24 container ship

It seems that despite all the fuss last year about the size of container ships and all the studies showing that they should not be built, the trend is continuing.  I’ve maintained all along that the cost savings just can’t be ignored, and big ships will continue, maybe getting even bigger.   Now we see there’s not a reversal yet, despite the academics. These new ships will be in the range of 24000 containers.  Mike Wackett’s article does a good job of examining the tradeoffs and the actual geometry and stacking of the containers that’s contemplated. And see the followup piece below in the same journal the next day.

Another interesting fact in the story is the divergence on what to use for energy. One line is going for LNG power, the other for conventional fuel with stack scrubbers. But clearly the environmental concerns are holding up, and companies are making plans to deal with the new regulations on environmental emissions from ocean carriers.

There’s been some written about the efficacy of scrubbers vs LNG and the economic and engineering tradeoffs aren’t totally clear, but clearly there are merits on both sides of that debate.
The Loadstar

Mike Wackett
via Latest newbuild ULCVs could be even bigger: introducing the Megamax-24 – The Loadstar

This followup piece is interesting in that more people are shipping smaller packages than container-size.  This means that consolidation will be a key function.  that is where 3PLs have a role. The carriers and especially ports need to get in that service business also, and make the process seamless for their end user customers.  It’s a big challenge, requiring a lot of cooperative activity. Not the carriers’ or ports’ strong point.

Of course we could use 20 foot containers instead of 40’s but that would just push the problem down a bit.  Short term it might be viable though.

The Loadstar

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via Bigger ships, smaller shipments… a circle that needs to be squared – The Loadstar

Analysis special: a Q&A with Panalpina board member Peter Ulber – The Loadstar

An excellent interview with a top exec in the forwarding field.  Notice his comments near the end on the technology based new breed of forwarders coming from Silicon Valley and elsewhere.

His position is that shortly everyone will have the technology. It’s the rest of the business that is hard to replicate.  Thus he sees much more consolidation ahead.

I tend to agree with his view– much of the new tech is simply more visibility of what’s going on in reality.  That can, over time, be duplicated; though with substantial risk. Most of us know that IT projects have a 70% risk of unsuccessful implementation.  This makes buying tech often look attractive. But people, particularly execs, tend to underestimate the difficulty of integrating tech into the existing business and tech processes.  It’s a good story worth following, and will provide many object lessons for IT pros and scholars in the years to come.

 

Source: Analysis special: a Q&A with Panalpina board member Peter Ulber – The Loadstar