Category Archives: Strategy

New Paper in American Journal of Transportation and Logistics

My colleague and I and a student recently published a new paper in the American Journal of Transportation and Logistics.  You can see it below.  The paper is based on a presentation made at the International Association of Maritime Economists’ 2017 annual meeting in Japan.

The paper is about Ocean Trading Intermediaries (OTI’s) and their distribution across the US. The data came from the Federal Maritime Commission’s lists of registered US and foreign OTIs, which includes Ocean Freight Forwarders and Non Vessel Owning Ocean Carriers.  WE discuss the history, legal framework, and current conditions facing OTIs and make special reference to the Chicago area, in which a cluster of these businesses has arisen.

We used statistical cluster analysis to show that despite the belief that ocean freight forwarding is becoming more technology driven and thus able to locate anywhere, the businesses still choose to form clusters in major ports.

AJTL logo   via Built to Last? The Changing Role of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries: Disintermediation and Reintermediation – eSciPub Journals: Open Access Peer Reviewed Journals

You can get the pdf here.  AJTL-2018-01-0201 published

How to cite this article:
Christopher Clott. Built to Last? The Changing Role of Ocean Transportation Intermediaries: Disintermediation and Reintermediation.  American
Journal of Transportation and Logistics, 2018,1:5.

 

Bigger ships, bigger ports an opening for 3PLs

This story indicates that 3PLs will provide the supply chain wisdom the ocean carriers and port operators  refuse to take on.  Look for more and more profitable intermediaries, rather than fewer, in ocean supply chains. They are not likely to be supplanted by blockchain systems.

By Gavin van Marle in Singapore 25/04/2018

logo  via Bigger ships and bigger ports an opening for 3PLs to revolutionise supply chains – The Loadstar

Metro Monitor 2018

This article discusses differences between cities and sectors around the country in terms of economics and demographics.  The authors show that economic divides are increasing between geographic areas.  There are a great many numbers which show these trends. Authors are Chad ShearerIsha ShahAlec Friedhoff, and Alan Berube;  and date is 

screenshot-www.brookings.edu 2018-01-25 13-18-03-392  via Metro Monitor 2018